The 14395: Daddy of the Jumbo Omega Constellations


For some particularly strange and inexplicable reason, given that Oriental wrists are noticeably smaller than their European counterparts, Omega released a series of “Jumbo” Constellation watches in the Far East in the late nineteen-fifties and early nineteen-sixties (see post below and here).  These 37mm diameter cases contained a spacer in which to embrace the 28mm automatic chronometer movements powering various models.

We know that at least three Jumbo collections were produced, mainly for the Japanese market which was a significant supporter of the Omega brand.  Case 168.001 was preceded by case 14777 and recently a Constellation collector jolted my memory that I had seen the Grandfather of them all, the 14395, some years back on eBay.  Washing around in the recesses of my memory was the thought that the 14395 was powered by a calibre 561 movement, but not so!  

The screw-in case 14395 shown above and below, courtesy of Omega collector Tony who was motivated to trawl Japanese locations in search of a 14777, was recently unearthed.  Tony initially thought the watch was indeed a 14777, until he opened the case back and received a very pleasant surprise: an almost pristine calibre 504 movement bearing a seventeen million serial number.  So not only was Omega remaindering its inventory of calibre 504s in cases 14747 and 14397, but it's clear the company decided to experiment with larger cases in the Far East with a calibre 504 powered 14395.


The dial, with what could only be described as having a very rare finish for a Constellation, contains the standard calibre 504 chronometer script. The case itself looks very much like a 14747 gold capped version, with a narrower tapering of the lugs at the case body. 

The model featured here is only the second example I recall having encountered.  Given the circumstances of the acquittal of calibre 504 movements across various model numbers prior and during the launch of the calibre 561, it’s reasonable to conclude that calibre 504 powered Jumbos are quite rare.

12 comments:

  1. Hi Desmond,

    I recently purchased a constellation online, but i suspect i got a franken watch. Are you able to be so kind to help me take a look? I can send u pictures or i can be contacted at brian_leong87@hotmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. Just put the pics on photobucket or some similar service Brian and post the url.

    Cheers

    Desmond

    ReplyDelete
  3. Excellent blog.

    Recently My cousin has given to me four omega movements. All were in a gold cases and now I'm trying to find and adecuate cases for they. One of this is a constellation with a 1022 movement (I have seen it is rare for you). You can see this movements in this web.

    http://www.relojes-especiales.com/foros/vintages/mis-ultimas-adquisiciones-y-ayuda-385860/

    Could you help me in order to find the correct number case?

    Best regards

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    Replies
    1. 166.0219 is the only model I can recall with a cal 1022. This model had an Octogonal case.

      Cheers

      Desmond

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    2. Many thanks.

      I have looked for in eBay and I have seen some Constellation with the same dial and movement (1022), using cases 168.045, 168.026, 168.015.... and they seems good watches, not franken.

      Best regards.

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    3. These models in some cases also were powered by the certified chronometer 1021, hence they are not exclusive 1022 models. In fact a 168 prefix denotes that the movement is a chronometer grade movement.

      You will notice that with the non-certified 1022 the lettering on the dial will not indicate officially certified chronometer.

      Certainly 168.015 does not have a cal 1022, it is powered by a cal 564. Most non-COSC Constellations were powered by the calibre 1020. 168.045 is powered by a calibre 751 and 168.026

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  4. Model 168.045 is a certified chronometer and has the calibre 751. 168.015 should be powered by a calibre 564 and have a domed dial, whereas 168.026 is not a Constellation model.

    Cheers

    Desmond

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    Replies
    1. Sorry but I'm only an amateur so I don't undertand some question. If you have seen my movement, in the dial has "oficially certified". This watch was in a gold case and I think it is all original. I don´t know how was the original case but I think it wasn't octogonal.

      Please, see these examples.

      http://www.ebay.es/itm/OMEGA-CONSTELLATION-CHRONOMETER-EDELSTAHL-AUTOMATIC-HERRENUHR-REF-168-0060-/281604261202?hash=item4190ec0552:g:ZKEAAOSwpDdU5eTK
      http://www.ebay.es/itm/NEAR-MINT-OMEGA-CONSTELLATION-GENUINE-REF-168-0060-AUTOMATIC-DAY-DATE-MENS-WATCH-/301807569144?hash=item46452208f8:g:6PsAAOSwbdpWVKWd

      Are these watches franken?

      Best regards.

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    2. Because the 10xx series is a fast beat movement often the bridge has been replaced with a new or substituted train bridge. The chronometer version of this model, which is an integrated bracelet piece and accordingly is identified as a 368.0854, should be powered by calibre 1021

      See here in the Omega Vintage Database: http://www.omegawatches.cn/planet-omega/heritage/vintage-details/15674/

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    3. Ok, thanks.

      In the same line, and seing my dial, it if possible that the bridge had been replaced with a new or substituted train bridge with 1022 legend.

      Best regards.

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    4. It is possible that the bridge has been replaced.

      The best idea is to have the person who gave you the movement to show you, by looking at examples on the internet, which case the movement came from

      Delete
  5. it is amazing and it is very interesting thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete